Igando-Igawa

Region: Iringa
Type: D - Known animal movement routes between two protected areas.
Threat: Moderate - less than 20 years remaining.
The Igando-Igawa Corridors
The Igando-Igawa Corridors

The Igando-Igawa Corridors

Description

The Mpanga/Kipengere Game Reserve was gazetted as recently as 2002 with the goal of maintaining the catchment function of the area, and sustainably managing the natural resources found within and around it.

The reserve is the source of the Mbarali, Mlomboji, Kimani and Ipera Rivers, which drain northwards and join the Great Ruaha River, which then drains into the Usangu Wetlands and associated swamps. As such, these rivers have vital ecological and economic significance.

The rivers and their catchments follow a continuum north through the old but still existing Igando-Igawa wildlife corridor with Usangu Game Reserve and Ruaha National Park. For this reason, the area forms a critical dry season refuge for wildlife.

The survival of the southern migratory species of the Usangu Game Reserve (as was) and the Ruaha National Park extension, are dependent on the Mpanga/Kipengere Game Reserve by way of the Igando-Igawa corridor.

Wildlife

LionAmongst the larger mammals known to use the corridor (although to what extent remains unclear) are buffalo, bush duiker, eland, elephant, red duiker  and zebra.

Larger carnivores present include caracal, serval, leopard and lion.

Threats

The corridor has already been greatly reduced and the only remaining uncultivated or ungrazed areas occur to the east of Igawa. Threats include clearance for agriculture, charcoal manufacture, burning and hunting.

It should be noted that further south there is technically no corridor between Mpanga/Kipengere and Kitulo National Park because they are contiguous. However, the link between these two PAs is important and it is possible that animals use another area to cross from one to another (see dotted red line in Fig. 6). The Wildlife Conservation Society has shown that lion and eland have returned to Kitulo from Mpanga/Kipengere and other species may follow.

References

No references - WCS work on-going