Selous-Niassa
(Western and Eastern Routes)

Region: Ruvuma
Type: D - Known animal movement routes between two protected areas.
Threat: Moderate - less than 20 years remaining.
Movements of elephants in the Selous-Niassa Corridor (Western routes), based on satellite tracking data and local knowledge.
Movements of elephants in the Selous-Niassa Corridor (Western routes), based on satellite tracking data and local knowledge.

Movements of elephants in the Selous-Niassa Corridor (Western routes), based on satellite tracking data and local knowledge.

Movements of elephants in the Selous-Niassa Corridor (Western routes), based on satellite tracking data and local knowledge. (By D. Mpanduji)

The Selous-Niassa Corridor
The Selous-Niassa Corridor

The Selous-Niassa Corridor

Description

Western Route:

The Selous – Niassa ecosystem, which extends across southern Tanzania into northern Mozambique, is one of the largest trans-boundary ecosystems in Africa covering approximately 154,000 km2 of miombo woodland interrupted by wetlands, open woodland and riparian forest. Within this ecosystem the Selous-Niassa Wildlife Corridor (SNWC) provides an important landscape linkage between the extensive protected areas of the Selous GR (47,000 km2), southern Tanzania and the Niassa GR (42,000 km2), northern Mozambique.

More on the Western Route

Eastern Route:

This is another more eastern wildlife corridor between the Selous and Niassa GRs especially the portion outside Nachingwea district. In this corridor migration of elephant, buffalo and zebra has been observed.

More on the Eastern Route

Wildlife

Western and Eastern portions.

TAWIRI / CIMU carried out regular aerial surveys since 1998 with the latest results available from 2006. From 2001 until 2003 the SWNC Research Project (Wildlife Department, TAWIRI, SUA Morogoro, Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, IZW, Berlin, Selous Conservation Programme, SCP-GTZ) showed with Argos satellite tracking the existence of elephant migration routes between Selous and Niassa GRs.

Beside the landscape species, elephants and wild dogs, the corridor supports populations of buffalo, crocodile, eland, impala, greater kudu, hartebeest, Roosevelt sable antelope, hippopotamus, leopard, lion, and Niassa wildebeest, to name a few, and constitutes a resting and breeding place for migratory birds on their fly way route from Europe to South Africa.

Threats

Western and Eastern portions.

Ribbon strip development of settlements along the major roads leads to the blockage of the corridor. Uncontrolled and unplanned conversion of land for agriculture and settlements on the major migratory routes leads to fragmentation of the ecosystem and increased human–wildlife conflicts.

Unsustainable and often illegal use of natural resources (illegal logging, fishing with poison) including the high value poaching of ivory across the national boundaries, uncontrolled fires and prospecting/mining for uranium and other minerals are severe threats to its continued existence. Note that EIAs for prospecting and mining were not carried out.

More on Threats

References

www.selous-niassa-corridor.com

Mpanduji, D., Hofer, H., Hilderbrandt, T., Goeritz, F. East, E. (2002). Movement of elephants in Selous-Niassa wildlife corridor, southern Tanzania. Pachyderm 33, 18-31.

Baldus, R., Hahn, R., Mpanduji, D, Siege, L. (2003). The Selous-Niassa Wildlife Corridor. Tanzania Wildlife Discussion Paper No 34.

Baldus, R. & Hahn, R. (2007) Connecting the world’s largest elephant ranges: The Selous – Niassa Wildlife Corridor. In: Saleem, H. A. ed. Peace Parks: Conservation and Conflict Resolution. Cambridge, MIT Press, Chapter 7.

Ntongani, W.A., Munishi, P.K.T., Mbilinyi, B.P. (2007). Land use/cover change and socio-economic factors influencing land cover dynamics in the Selous-Niassa wildlife corridor Nachingwea District Tanzania. Proceedings of the Sixth TAWIRI Scientific Conference. Dec, 2007.

Pesambili, A.A. (2003). Wildlife resources of Lukwika-Lumesule and Msanjesi GR. WWF-TPO