Wami Mbiki-Sadaani

Region: Morogoro
Type: A - Unconfirmed corridors.
Threat: Extreme - probably less than 1 year remaining or already closed.

Description

Wami Mbiki WMA is situated 150 km due west of Dar es Salaam north of the Dar es Salaam-Morogoro highway in Morogoro and Coast Regions. The WMA is a watershed for the Wami River, which runs from west to east through the northern third of the area, joined by many minor and seasonal rivers, including the Lukigula River from the north and the Ngerengere River that makes up the southern boundary.

The area is interspersed with rocky hillsides of thin soil cover and valleys with deep clay or alluvial soils, altitudes vary between 350 and 400 m with some high spots of 500 m. The primary vegetation type inside the WMA is woodland.

Wami Mbiki is less than 100 km from Sadani NP and Mikumi NP respectively. The area west of Wami Mbiki is intersected by the Chalinze-Arusha Highway and numerous villages and settlements along the highway. The number of settlements away from the highway is not known but it is thought that those settlements are mostly small and scattered.

The Wami-Mbiki to Selous/Mikumi/Handeni/Saadani Corridors.
The Wami-Mbiki to Selous/Mikumi/Handeni/Saadani Corridors.

The Wami-Mbiki to Selous/Mikumi/Handeni/Saadani Corridors.

Wildlife

It is thought, although not fully documented that elephants and buffalo move between Wami Mbiki and Sadani.

Recent interviews held in the villages at the north-eastern side of Wami support sightings of elephants and buffaloes using this corridor. The animals are supposed to migrate in the rainy season.

Presently, little documentation is available on migratory routes and all corridor information requires further investigation.

Threats

The corridor is under increasing pressure due to human settlements, timber exploitation and charcoal burning.

Wildlife moving between Sadani and Wami Mbiki, however, would be forced to cross the Chalinze-Arusha highway.

Given increasing human development, it is unlikely that this corridor can be sustained for very long.

References

No references